On Main Street | Friends establish deli in empty Locust Street storefront

By Karen Larsen
Empire Press Correspondent

This occasional column highlights business news in Waterville and in other Douglas County communities. If you have business news that you would like to appear in this column, email larsen.karen.y@gmail.com.

 

Co-owners Debbie Angilley and Juanita Malone pose in front of The Pioneer Park Deli located at 114 W. Locust St. in Waterville. (Empire Press photo/Karen Larsen)

Since they became friends about eight years ago, Debbie Angilley and Juanita Malone have talked about going into business together. Just two months ago they were taking a walk in Waterville and noticed the empty storefront at 114 W. Locust St. The storefront most recently housed The Shocker Shack.

Immediately the two had an interest in using the building for their business. They went home and spoke with their husbands, Wayne Angilley and Kevin Malone, and both men were completely behind the idea of starting a deli in the storefront.

They called the building owner and found that a lease arrangement could be worked out.

From that day on the two women and their husbands worked quickly to renovate the building and design their business: Pioneer Park Deli.

The business had a soft opening on March 25, and was expected to be in full swing by the first week in April.

On March 24, Debbie Angilley and Juanita Malone said they were both nervous and excited at the opening of this new endeavor.

The two women, who live in Waterville and at McNeil Canyon, respectively, said that they saw a need in the Waterville Community for another food service establishment, especially one that could be open daily for lunch. They also noticed another vacuum in the community — a place where people can buy hard ice cream.

The two women are starting with three flavors of ice cream — vanilla, chocolate and strawberry — and then plan to continue adding flavors until they fill their 10-flavor case.

They said that as people in the community learned about the new business they expressed a lot of excitement. The aspect of the business that people commented on most prior to opening was the hard ice cream.

“Everybody is excited about the ice cream cones,” Angilley said.

Besides ice cream, the deli will sell a number of breakfast sandwiches as well as pancakes. Baked goods, pizza by the slice, sandwiches and wraps, salads, soups and beverages will make up the menu for the rest of the day. The deli is open 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday; 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday; and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.

During the summer, they are hoping to put picnic tables in the back of the deli and have afternoon barbecues there on Saturday and Sunday afternoons. They are also hoping to eventually be able to bring in live music for these barbecues.

Personally, both women describe themselves as social people and say they are looking forward to getting to know their customers and catering to their tastes. They will have a suggestion box in the deli and are planning to adjust their menu as they see what their customers want.

Pioneer Park Deli can be reached at (509) 387-5234.

 

The Waterville Historic Hotel will reopen for the season on April 27 and will offer rooms until the end of October. The smoke-free hotel offers a variety of rooms from basic to deluxe in addition to a small and large suite. Walk-ins are welcome until midnight. The hotel offers free wi-fi and continental breakfast. Additional information can be found at the hotel website at watervillehotel.com or by calling 745-8695.

 

The Blue Rooster is open from 7:30 to 10:00 a.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays. The menu includes French press coffees, teas, smoothies, root beer floats, homemade pastries and more. For large orders (12 or more items), call ahead at 293-6070.

 

Members of the Philomathic Club of Waterville want to remind those who wish to purchase a local phone book that they are available at town hall for $5. All proceeds go to the local club and are used for a scholarship for a Shocker senior and also to send a Waterville High School junior to Girls State during the summer.

 

Knemeyers Eatery & Spirits is the new home of Waterville’s weekly senior lunch. The lunch will be held for the first time at Knemeyers at noon on April 6. Those present will discuss the best day of the week for future lunches. Cost of the lunch, which includes a drink and dessert, will be $8. The lunch is open to everyone age 50 and older.

Knemeyers is open from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Thursdays and from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays. The menu includes burgers, sandwiches, wraps, salads and pizza. The full menu is available at the website at knemeyers.com.

Knemeyers hosts banquets for up to 30 people in its brick room. Owners Candy Jones and Casey Smith have been working on different banquet menus and are happy to work with banquet hosts to provide just the right catering for the occasion. For more information, contact the restaurant at 745-8450.

 

Kim Martin has recently joined North Cascades Bank as the Human Resources Manager out of the bank’s Chelan branch. Martin attended Washington State University and earned her certification as a Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) from Seattle University. Most recently, she spent 12 years working in Human Resources and Recruiting at the Boeing Company.

 

Waterville Parts Supply employee Addie Tonseth is now a NAPA certified counterperson.

Stop by the store to check out the selection of lawn and garden tools and small engine parts.

 

Umpqua Bank offers home equity lines of credit with interest-only payments that can be used for house repairs, remodels, debt consolidation, vacation and much more. These start at 4.75 percent.

 

Waterville Parlor is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. The parlor specializes in family haircuts.

 

Highway 2 Brew, Waterville’s popular espresso business, is ready for summer. Popular drinks include huckleberry milkshakes, mango green tea, ruby red grapefruit flavored lemonade, energy drinks and drinks with chocolate added. Box lunches include a sandwich, chips, fruit and cookies and are great for a fishing trip, farmers going to work or anyone with a busy schedule.

A new landscaping project is starting at Highway 2 Brew and they are looking for old wheelbarrows. Just drop your wheelbarrow off in the parking lot at Highway 2 Brew and leave your name at the window. Keep an eye out for what happens next!

Highway 2 Brew opens weekdays at 5:30 a.m., Saturdays at 6:30 a.m. and Sundays at 7:30 a.m.